Reclaim the City – Street Talk

Streaming Club Session #2 of 2021 - Reclaim the City

Register now for our second Streaming Club session on 27 May 2021, which focuses on environmental racism and spatial injustice in the City of Cape Town, as well as on the mutually reinforcing nature of housing rights and environmental rights.

The streaming club session has two parts:

Part 1 (STREAM): Before 7pm on 27 May, stream the short film Reclaim the City (15 minutes long) in your own homes. The film is made by Street Talk and shares the voices of activists and community members involved in the Reclaim the City movement. It is a powerful illustration of the relationships amongst inequitable distribution of land and housing, and livelihoods and human flourishing.

Part 2 (ENGAGE): Engage with our expert panel via Zoom from 7pm to 8pm about insights arising from the film as well as the recent court victory in the Tafelberg case. To register and get Zoom details, click here.

Members who register can participate in our online competition and win a copy of an incredible book by one of our panelists, Marius Pieterse: Rights-based Litigation, Urban Governance and Social Justice in South Africa: The Right To Joburg. To participate in the competition, you can become a member for as little as R250/R500 (depending on the type of membership).

The panel is made up of three incredible and inspiring experts working in the human rights and social justice space.

       

From left to right:

Marius Pieterse is a professor in the School of Law at the University of the Witwatersrand, where he mostly teaches constitutional and human rights law. His research focuses on urban governance, local government law and the realisation of socio-economic rights, specifically in an urban context. Marius holds a B2 rating from the National Research Foundation (NRF) of South Africa. He is the author of “Rights-based Litigation, Urban Governance and Social Justice in South Africa: The right to Joburg” (Routledge, 2017); “Can Rights Cure? The Impact of Human Rights Litigation on South Africa’s Health System” (PULP, 2014) as well as a large number of peer reviewed academic journal articles on different aspects of rights-based litigation, socio-economic rights, urban governance, the right to health, the right to equality and the relationship between law and urban space. He is joint global coordinator of the International Research Group of Law and Urban Space (IRGLUS).

Tarryn Cooper-Bell is a Senior Attorney at the Equal Education Law Centre (EELC). The EELC was a friend of the court in the Tafelberg case. Tarryn obtained both her Bachelor of Science degree as well as her LLB from Rhodes University. She trained as a candidate attorney at the Rhodes University Law Clinic where she was involved in general litigation and various other access to justice programmes.After her admission in 2012 she was employed as an associate at the Boksburg based law firm of Malherbe, Rigg & Ranwell Attorneys where she specialised in municipal law. The call towards human rights and social justice however inspired her return to the Rhodes University Law Clinic as an attorney in charge of the advice office programme in early 2014 where she furthered the Law Clinic’s work in the human rights field. She progressed through the ranks to head of legal services for the Grahamstown office and member of the Rhodes University Law Clinic management committee. As an attorney at the Law Clinic, Tarryn was involved in general litigation, LLB student supervision and lecturing of various modules in the LLB Legal Practice course. Tarryn joined the EELC in April 2017 to contribute towards the fight for social justice and equal, quality education for all on a national level.

Mandisa Shandu is a Co-Director and Attorney at Ndifuna Ukwazi (NU). NU is a non-profit activist organisation and law centre that combines litigation, research and community organising in campaigns aimed at advancing urban land justice in Cape Town. The organisation’s primary mission is to expand and protect access to affordable housing and to build a more equal and spatially just city. Mandisa is responsible for leading the organisation’s law centre which she founded in 2015.  NU’s law centre offers legal support and representation to individuals, client communities and social movements. Mandisa’s areas of practice support the organisation’s work of advancing urban land justice, including constitutional, property and housing law, and access to basic services. Prior to working at Ndifuna Ukwazi, Mandisa worked as a commercial law attorney at ENSAfrica. She is a University of Cape Town graduate holding a B.Soc.Sci degree in political science and an LLB degree. She is currently pursuing her LLM in Constitutional and Administrative Law at the same institution. Mandisa was announced as one of the Mail and Guardian’s Top 200 Young South Africans in 2016.

Street Talk’s film, Reclaim the City, is about a group of Reclaim The City activists in Cape Town. Let’s listen to and engage with their voices:

“We are sick and tired of being used by politicians who whenever there is an election promise us houses and pretend to care but in the
end do nothing…” Elizabeth Gqoboka

“We have to break the chain of eviction and lack of housing…. we are doing this for the next generation and will go on occupying more and more buildings….” Shaneeka Abdullah

“Living in the city unites families, brings us closer to our workplaces, schools and healthcare…” Lindiwe Beyi

“Why are we only good enough to take care of white people’s children but we can’t live near them??” Elizabeth Gqoboka

Our panel of experts will discuss spatial apartheid in South Africa, and the legal and policy issues arising from spatial apartheid that give rise to struggles such as those of Reclaim the City.

Date
27 May 2021

}

Time
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm

Street Talk’s film, Reclaim the City, is about a group of Reclaim The City activists in Cape Town. Let’s listen to and engage with their voices:

“We are sick and tired of being used by politicians who whenever there is an election promise us houses and pretend to care but in the
end do nothing…” Elizabeth Gqoboka

“We have to break the chain of eviction and lack of housing…. we are doing this for the next generation and will go on occupying more and more buildings….” Shaneeka Abdullah

“Living in the city unites families, brings us closer to our workplaces, schools and healthcare…” Lindiwe Beyi

“Why are we only good enough to take care of white people’s children but we can’t live near them??” Elizabeth Gqoboka

Our panel of experts will discuss spatial apartheid in South Africa, and the legal and policy issues arising from spatial apartheid that give rise to struggles such as those of Reclaim the City.

Date
27 May 2021

}

Time
7:00 pm - 8:00 pm